Occipitofrontalis muscle and the Vagus Nerve

Questions and comments about this weird approach to hair loss
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galeaoman
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Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:16 am

Occipitofrontalis muscle and the Vagus Nerve

Post by galeaoman »

Doing the scalp exercise possibly stimulates some of these nerves somehow. For a long time I wondered if there was a connection with the scalp exercise and the digestive tract :ugeek:


http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/834808-overview

Occipitofrontalis muscle

The occipitofrontalis muscle consists of 2 occipital bellies and 2 frontal bellies. The occipital bellies arise from the superior nuchal lines on the occipital bone. The frontal bellies originate from the skin and superficial fascia of the upper eyelids. The occipital and frontal bellies insert into the epicranial aponeurosis.

Each occipital belly is innervated by the posterior auricular branch of the facial nerve, and each frontal belly is innervated by the frontal branch of the facial nerve. The frontal bellies can raise the eyebrows.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posterior_auricular_nerve

The posterior auricular nerve arises from the facial nerve close to the stylomastoid foramen and runs upward in front of the mastoid process; here it is joined by a filament from the auricular branch of the vagus and communicates with the posterior branch of the great auricular as well as with the lesser occipital.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vagus_nerve


The vagus nerve, historically cited as the pneumogastric nerve, is the tenth cranial nerve or CN X, and interfaces with parasympathetic control of the heart, lungs and digestive tract.

The nervous system is like a tree ...the tree of life :D
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galeaoman
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Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:16 am

Re: Occipitofrontalis muscle and the Vagus Nerve

Post by galeaoman »

http://www.healthguidance.org/entry/120 ... rders.html


The vagus nerve is actually two nerves, both of which run from the brain stem and branch out separately, down the body, across the abdomen and to the main organs such as the heart and stomach. Disorders of the vagus nerve are often also called 10th cranial nerve disorders and they can have a variety of different effects upon the human body.

The vagus nerve is directly responsible for a number of bodily functions, such as breathing, maintaining digestive function, keeping the brain up to date with what we have eaten and/or digested and monitoring the heart beat to keep it regular. Any disorders of the vagus nerve can affect these functions, but some effects are more common than others. For example, if there is pressure upon the vagus nerve, or it is stimulated for any reason then the result is usually unconsciousness, clammy, cool skin and nausea. This is because when stimulated, the vagus nerve causes the heart to slow down and blood pressure levels to drop considerably. While this might appear to be a negative, the vagus nerve is sometimes stimulated to treat people with severe depression or epilepsy conditions.


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Tom Hagerty
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Re: Occipitofrontalis muscle and the Vagus Nerve

Post by Tom Hagerty »

In that article from Medscape that you linked to is this statement: "The frontal bellies [of the frontalis muscle] originate from the skin and superficial fascia of the upper eyelids."

In Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary the origin of the frontalis is listed as the procerus, corrugator, and orbicularis oris muscles.

In other words, one says that the origin is the skin and superficial fascia and the other says that the origin is the muscles around the eye.

From my perspective, it doesn't matter. What I notice in myself and others who do the scalp exercise correctly is that there are no hooded upper eyelids. This is significant. Puffiness in the upper eyelid area makes a person look older. If the scalp exercise can maximize hair growth and minimize hooded eyelids at the same time, that would be a plus.

The point of your message, though, is that there is a connection between the occipitofrontalis and the vagus nerve. I can't comment on this because I don't know if it is true and I don't know its significance.
galeaoman
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Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:16 am

Re: Occipitofrontalis muscle and the Vagus Nerve

Post by galeaoman »

Tom Hagerty wrote: From my perspective, it doesn't matter. What I notice in myself and others who do the scalp exercise correctly is that there are no hooded upper eyelids. This is significant. Puffiness in the upper eyelid area makes a person look older. If the scalp exercise can maximize hair growth and minimize hooded eyelids at the same time, that would be a plus.
Charles Bronson had great hair.

All tough guys have hooded eyes :P
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