Occipitalis and skin tightness.

Questions and comments about this weird approach to hair loss
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TransientHair
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Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2014 11:08 am

Occipitalis and skin tightness.

Post by TransientHair » Thu Mar 13, 2014 3:59 am

Hi, Tom. When I contract my Occipitalis muscles I can feel the skin in the middle of my scalp tighten up and become pretty much unmovable during the contraction. However, the skin on the vertex of my scalp and on my forehead still remains relatively loose during the contraction. Is this normal?

Tom Hagerty
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Re: Occipitalis and skin tightness.

Post by Tom Hagerty » Thu Mar 13, 2014 7:47 am

When I contract my Occipitalis muscles I can feel the skin in the middle of my scalp tighten up...


When I contract my occipitalis muscles at the back of the head (and I get a super-strong contraction) my scalp tightens up too. My scalp becomes unmovable but the skin of my forehead remains loose.

I think you are telling me about what happens when you contract the occipitalis muscle because you want to know if you are really contracting the right muscle - those two muscular slips at the back of your head. There are two sure ways to make sure you are getting a firm contraction of the occips, and one not-so-sure way:

1. Your ears will move backward and flatten out against your skull. (When you contract your frontalis muscle at the front of your head the tips of the ears will rise - they'll move upward.) Your ears will always move when you are doing the scalp exercise correctly.

2. Those two muscular slips at the back of your head will tighten up just like any muscle when you contract it. Look at the anatomical drawing. Place your fingers firmly over the area where you see the occipitalis muscles. Now contract these muscles. If you are indeed getting a contraction, you will feel these muscles bunching up under your fingers.

3. This is not exactly a sure way but check it out anyway. Many people feel a "burn" when they first start to do the scalp exercise correctly. After a minute or so of contracting the occipitalis, this muscle will start to hurt. The hurt comes from the build-up of lactic acid in this previously unused muscle. This lactic acid burn indicates that the occips are contracting strongly.
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Occipitalis Muscle.gif
Those two "impossible" muscles
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TransientHair
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2014 11:08 am

Re: Occipitalis and skin tightness.

Post by TransientHair » Thu Mar 13, 2014 8:34 am

I think you are telling me about what happens when you contract the occipitalis muscle because you want to know if you are really contracting the right muscle
No, I can definitely feel my occipitalis muscles contracting; they are quite large now. I was just wondering if the skin on my forehead and the vertex of my scalp had to tighten up too to benefit in those areas. Based on what you said, it seems that is not the case.

Tom Hagerty
Site Admin
Posts: 614
Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2010 9:21 am

Re: Occipitalis and skin tightness.

Post by Tom Hagerty » Fri Mar 14, 2014 8:06 am

I get emails from people all the time telling me that they can contract both the frontalis muscle and the occipitalis muscle at the same time. This of course tightens up all the areas of the scalp at once - the forehead, the vertex, and the occipital area.

It's possible to contract both of these epicranial muscles at the same time. But why do it? It's counterproductive. What is really beneficial for the scalp and the hair follicles is the alternating contraction of the frontalis and occipitalis muscles. This powers about 3/4 inch of scalp movement. This movement generates increased blood flow to the area, quickened lymph flow, and perhaps healthier capillaries that nourish the hair follicles.

You are probably doing the SE right. This message is for those who are making the scalp exercise more difficult than it already is. Trying to contract both scalp muscles at the same time produces stagnation, not movement.

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