High Blood Pressure and Baldness

Discussions about the most common form of male hair loss - androgenetic alopecia
galeaoman
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:16 am

High Blood Pressure and Baldness

Post by galeaoman » Sat Dec 24, 2016 9:13 am

There could be a correlation with higher blood pressure and baldness in many people. I notice that my blood pressure and body weight has gradually been increasing over the last 20 years.

Now I am 55 years old and I seek to improve my health and the scalp exercise might help me along with other exercises like walking and weight lifting with a set of 20 lb and 35 lb dumbells. I have noticed an almost immediate benefit with the scalp flexing. There are watery bags under my eyes that become greatly diminished after practicing the flexing workouts of the occipitofrontalis muscles. I practice many minutes every day until the muscles behind my ears become like tired dogs.

The doctor put me on blood pressure medication - lisinopril at 5 mg dose. That is a low dose and I hope to get off the medication if I can lose weight and improve my health with diet and exercise. My balding condition is a Norwood six on the balding scale but I have no real expectations to grow more hair just hoping for a healthy scalp and toned face muscles and stronger neck muscles. :mrgreen:

galeaoman
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:16 am

Re: High Blood Pressure and Baldness

Post by galeaoman » Sat Dec 24, 2016 10:17 pm

Miniaturized Hairs Maintain Contact with the Arrector Pili Muscle in Alopecia Areata but not in Androgenetic Alopecia: A Model for Reversible Miniaturization and Potential for Hair Regrowth - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3500053/

Alopecia areata has the potential for regrowth but not androgenetic balding and miniaturization, interesting. The hypothesis is that the arrector pili muscle (APM) attachment to the hair follicle bulge. The bulge is a recognized repository of stem cells and it may be necessary for reversal of hair follicle miniaturization.

Perhaps changes in the skin of the upper scalp cause changes and eventual separation of vellus hairs from the arrector pilli muscles. I am wondering if restoration of the tissues of the upper scalp can re-establish connection of the arrector pilli muscles with the vellus hairs?

I know there are several types of animals that can somewhat consciously control their arrector pili muscles in certain circumstances like for example when a threatened animal raises their shackles and their fur stands up to make them look larger and more intimidating. I found this interesting article about the arector pili

Beyond Goosebumps: Does the Arrector Pili Muscle Have a Role in Hair Loss?

http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC4158628/

galeaoman
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:16 am

Re: High Blood Pressure and Baldness

Post by galeaoman » Mon Dec 26, 2016 3:40 am

Interesting ideas on how gravity may contribute to pattern balding...

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 092856.htm


In the scalp, DHT seems to cause hair follicles to become thinner. But in other areas of the body, such as the underarms and genital area, DHT and other male sex hormones promote thickening of hair follicles. Why should DHT affect scalp hair one way but hair in other areas in a different way? And why does balding -- and the associated increase in DHT levels -- occur only on the top of the head?

The answer, Dr. Ustuner believes, is the weight of the scalp on the hair follicles. In youth, the scalp has sufficient fat tissue under the skin, and it is "capable of keeping itself well-hydrated," buffering the pressure on hair follicles. But with aging, the skin and underlying (subcutaneous) fat become thinner, and the pressure on the hair follicles increases. Testosterone contributes to thinning of the subcutaneous fat. In women, estrogen prevents thinning of these cushioning tissues, at least until menopause.

Aging and Testosterone-Related Changes Create 'Vicious Circle' Leading to Hair Loss As the cushion decreases, the hair follicle must strive against higher pressure, requiring more testosterone to achieve normal growth. This "local demand" leads to a buildup of DHT levels in the scalp, but not in the bloodstream. Rising DHT levels cause further erosion of the subcutaneous fat -- creating a "vicious circle," according to Dr. Ustuner.

The hair growth cycle accelerates in response to DHT, but it's not enough to overcome the increased pressure. Over time, the hair follicle becomes smaller and smaller, resulting in progressively increasing hair loss.

If the pressure created by the weight of the scalp is the cause of balding, then hair loss should occur at the top of the head -- "This is exactly what happens in AGA," Dr. Ustuner points out. He believes that individual hair loss patterns are affected by differences in the shape of the head, reflecting variations in scalp pressure. The weight of the facial soft tissues adds to the pressure at the front of the scalp, contributing to hair loss there. In contrast, the ears help resist the effects of gravity on the scalp, lessening hair loss on the sides of the head.

"There is not another theory that reasonably and satisfactorily explains hair loss in AGA without ascribing a function to DHT that is opposite to its known function," Dr. Ustuner writes. He notes that, while several factors suggest that genetic factors contribute to male pattern baldness, the increase in scalp DHT levels "is not an occurrence directly determined by genes."



galeaoman
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:16 am

Re: High Blood Pressure and Baldness

Post by galeaoman » Mon Dec 26, 2016 4:26 am

A very interesting paper...

Cause of Androgenic Alopecia: Crux of the Matter

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4174066/


Why does DHT (or 5-alpha reductase enzyme activity) increase in balding scalp?

This question requires a solid answer and has priority over the other crucial questions that are as follows:

How does DHT cause hair loss while exactly the opposite effect is expected?

Why does balding (or increase in DHT levels) occur only at the top of the head?



Tom Hagerty
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Re: High Blood Pressure and Baldness

Post by Tom Hagerty » Mon Dec 26, 2016 2:49 pm

Dr. Ustuner says: "Pressure on the hair follicles created by the weight of the scalp is the cause of AGA." And he also mentions the shape of the cranium as being causative in male pattern baldness. Then he says: "since its introduction, the new theory has been regarded with notable skepticism and resistance."

I can understand why Dr. Ustuner's theory as to the cause of hair loss has been regarded with skepticism.

galeaoman
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Re: High Blood Pressure and Baldness

Post by galeaoman » Mon Dec 26, 2016 4:30 pm

I believe science requires that all new theories need to be met with skepticism so more experiments can be derived in order to falsify the new hypothesis. :D

DHT buildup in the upper scalp tissues might cause thinning of those tissues, resulting in more pressure exerted on the hair follicles, restricting further growth in a vicious cycle. As an analogy, grass cannot grow very well in hard clay packed soil. There must be room for the roots to expand.

Like the law of entropy, the balding process would become irreversible unless work was put back into the system(improved lymphatic drainage?)

I tried minoxidil a few years ago. Hair was growing on my head but I suffered side effects. My legs and arms started itching and swelling up. This minoxidil side effect possibly agrees with S Foote's edema hypothesis

Mr. Hagerty, you wrote that some people who get hair transplants to their scalp find it difficult to do the scalp exercise. Maybe the transplants punch through several layers of tissue. I view the "donor dominance" theory with a skeptical eye also...

Tom Hagerty
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Re: High Blood Pressure and Baldness

Post by Tom Hagerty » Tue Dec 27, 2016 8:52 am

As an analogy, grass cannot grow very well in hard clay packed soil.
That's a convincing analogy and it might be right to the point for someone who is deconstructing a poem or a short story. But analogy I think is an ineffective way to destroy or legitimize a physiological theory. But let's not spend time over this because I understand your criticism.
There must be room for the roots to expand.
When scalp tissue is thin and tight terminal hair follicles do not flourish. When the skin of the scalp over the galea is shiny and paper thin there is indeed no room for the hair follicle "roots" to expand. A terminal hair follicle is between 3 and 5 millimeters in length inserted diagonally in the skin of the scalp. A thin, tight, shiny scalp is a poor environment for a terminal hair.

My speculation is that the scalp exercise loosens up the scalp and perhaps contributes to keeping it thick. The SE certainly stimulates the growth of capillaries in the scalp and around the base of the hair follicles. These capillaries bring nourishment to the cells of the hair follicles, some of the most rapidly dividing cells in the human body. But I don't state these ideas as fact because I have no solid research to back them up. All I have is some anecdotal evidence - people, including me, that have benefitted from doing the scalp exercise.

galeaoman
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:16 am

Re: High Blood Pressure and Baldness

Post by galeaoman » Thu Dec 29, 2016 4:25 am

What causes hair follicles to become sensitive to androgens? Maybe it could be a type of feedback cycle? Hypothetically speaking, the causal factors for MPB appear to be several - including androgens, that will all work in tandem. When one is triggered then the rest will automatically follow suit and become a chain reaction that becomes compunded, leading to the progressive and apparently irreversible stages of MPB.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4639964/

Context:

Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a frequent disorder characterized by progressive hair miniaturization in a very similar pattern among all affected men. The pathogenesis is related to androgen-inducible overexpression of transforming growth factor β-1 from balding dermal papilla cells, which is involved in epithelial inhibition and perifollicular fibrosis. Recent research shows that hair follicle androgen sensitivity is regulated by Hic-5, an androgen receptor co-activator which may be activated by the mechanical stimulation. Moreover, the dermis of scalp susceptible to be affected by AGA is firmly bounded to the galea aponeurotica, so the physical force exerted by the occipitofrontalis muscle is transmitted to the scalp skin.

Aims:

To know whether mechanical stress supported by hair follicles is involved in AGA phenomenon.

Materials and Methods:

It is performed with a finite element analysis of a galea model and a schematic representation of AGA progression according to Hamilton–Norwood scale in order to establish the correlation between elastic deformation in scalp and clinical progression of male pattern baldness.

Results:

The result was a highly significant correlation (r: −0.885, P < 0.001) that clearly identifies a mechanical factor in AGA development.

Conclusions:

All these data suggest that mechanical stress determines AGA patterning and a stretch-induced and androgen-mediated mechanotransduction in dermal papilla cells could be the primary mechanism in AGA pathogenesis.


Tom Hagerty
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Re: High Blood Pressure and Baldness

Post by Tom Hagerty » Fri Dec 30, 2016 8:49 am

galeaoman, Why did you select as your source of theoretical information The International Journal of Trichology - the official Journal of the Hair Research Society of India? This is a neutral question, not an adversarial question. The following is a paragraph from this journal that you cited:
This fact takes sense if it is considered that scalp skin susceptible to be affected by AGA presents unique anatomical and biomechanical features. Regardless the pattern or degree of severity, AGA is always limited to the skin overlying the galea aponeurotica. This is a thin and relatively inelastic tendon-like tissue sheet that communicates the frontal and occipital bellies of occipitofrontalis muscle. Balding scalp skin is firmly bounded to galea by fibrous rigid subcutaneous layer, so elastic deformation affecting the galea is shared by the three upper layers as a structural unit, whereas the remaining scalp skin freely slides over deeper layer, with low strain transmission to hair follicles and unaffected by AGA.
Can you give me any anatomical evidence that "balding scalp skin [or any scalp skin] is firmly bounded to the galea by a fibrous subcutaneous layer..." This is probably true but I'd like to see the evidence. What I question, though, is the conclusion of "elastic deformation," whatever that is.

The article says that, "Mechanical strain is transmitted from the galea to the skin." If I understand the article correctly, it implies that this strain on the skin above the galea may cause the miniaturization of the previously thick, pigmented hairs. Does this idea make sense to you?

Another theory, one espoused by Dr. Rei Ogawa of the Nippon Medical School in Tokyo, seems to indicate just the opposite. The Mechanotherapy theory states that stimulation of the skin of the scalp (massage, exercises) may produce terminal hair in previously thinning areas. You can check out Dr. Ogawa's papers and videos by typing his name into the Google search bar.
Rei Ogawa.png
Check out his presentation at the 8th World Congress for Hair Research on YouTube.
Rei Ogawa.png (21.9 KiB) Viewed 5995 times
There are many theories about the causes and cures of hair loss floating around on the Internet. Some are well thought out but some are totally ridiculous.

galeaoman
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:16 am

Re: High Blood Pressure and Baldness

Post by galeaoman » Fri Dec 30, 2016 10:03 am

Tom Hagerty wrote:galeaoman, Why did you select as your source of theoretical information The International Journal of Trichology - the official Journal of the Hair Research Society of India? This is a neutral question, not an adversarial question.
It says that they are a peer reviewed journal but they could be crackpots too - I am just looking for ways to think outside the donor dominance theoretical box :D
Can you give me any anatomical evidence that "balding scalp skin [or any scalp skin] is firmly bounded to the galea by a fibrous subcutaneous layer..." This is probably true but I'd like to see the evidence. What I question, though, is the conclusion of "elastic deformation," whatever that is.

The article says that, "Mechanical strain is transmitted from the galea to the skin." If I understand the article correctly, it implies that this strain on the skin above the galea may cause the miniaturization of the previously thick, pigmented hairs. Does this idea make sense to you?
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/834808-overview


Connective tissue (superficial fascia)

"The superficial fascia is a fibrofatty layer that connects skin to the underlying aponeurosis of the occipitofrontalis muscle and provides a passageway for nerves and blood vessels. Blood vessels are attached to this fibrous connective tissue. If the vessels are cut, this attachment prevents vasospasm, which could lead to profuse bleeding after injury."


Maybe that could be true about the galea tightening as the beginning of the downward spiral of hairloss. A tight inelastic galea sheath could cause strain to the dermal layers above, which precipitates the release of compounds like Hic-5 that regulate and co-activate hair follicle sensitivity to androgens or it could be that DHT causes follicle miniaturization and the dermal layers to shrink to become tight first then the galea becomes tightened. Stephen Foote proposes that fluid pressure and contact inhibition is responsible for follicular miniaturization and eventual baldness. Most of the hair on my feet and lower legs has fallen out. The doctor told me that I have some edema in my legs. Can fluid pressure cause hair loss? Maybe...
Another theory, one espoused by Dr. Rei Ogawa of the Nippon Medical School in Tokyo, seems to indicate just the opposite. The Mechanotherapy theory states that stimulation of the skin of the scalp (massage, exercises) may produce terminal hair in previously thinning areas. You can check out Dr. Ogawa's papers and videos by typing his name into the Google search bar.
Rei Ogawa.png
There are many theories about the causes and cures of hair loss floating around on the Internet. Some are well thought out but some are totally ridiculous.
My instincts tell me that finger massage will not work very well to restore hair. Putting hot peppers on the scalp or some other irritant might give a temporary burst of hair growth but that type of hair growth is not permanent. But those methods might cause VEGF to be temporarily released https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vascular_ ... wth_factor Minoxidil grows hair by up-regulating VEGF. You said that the scalp exercise leads to more VEGF expression too. Exercising the scalp with your method might not work as fast as minoxidil but probably is much better in the long run.

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