Tom, maybe you really found a cure.

Discussions about the most common form of male hair loss - androgenetic alopecia
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VegetaHairline
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Tom, maybe you really found a cure.

Post by VegetaHairline » Sat Oct 08, 2016 7:11 am

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4639964/

According to this article, the frontalis-occipital muscles play a critical role in male pattern baldness.
Galea genetic deformation may play a role in baldness.

Tom, your exercises tone up the galea and all the muscles surrounding the scalp, right? Maybe this is why the scalp exercises could be the real solution for MPB.

So balding hairs and non balding hairs are not genetically different. That's amazing.

I know that my scalp feels much better ever since i started experiment with my forehead and occipitals. It just feels... less tight.
Maybe it's placebo, maybe not.

Tom Hagerty
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Re: Tom, maybe you really found a cure.

Post by Tom Hagerty » Sat Oct 08, 2016 4:45 pm

According to this article, the frontalis-occipital muscles play a critical role in male pattern baldness.
The writer of the article believes that elastic deformation of scalp tissue is brought about by mechanical stress. And this is the active factor in AGA. In other words, he wants "to establish the correlation between elastic deformation in the scalp and clinical progression of male pattern baldness."

He says that, "mechanical stimulation can promote the overexpression of molecular signals implicated in AGA pathogenesis."

Again he says that, "the aim of the present study was to analyze the correlation between stress distribution in the galea and clinical progression of male pattern baldness in order to know whether mechanical stress is involved in AGA phenomena."

In the Discussion section at the end of the article he says, "The result of this study can only be understood if it assumes that the hair follicle is a mechano-sensitive organ."

But as opposed to what I think, he says that "the increase of occipitofrontalis muscle activity due to any circumstance could be considered a hair loss accelerator."

On this theme he says, "So the elimination of stretch in the skin seems to promote the anagen [growing] phase of hair. In this sense, the treatment of the scalp muscles with botulinum toxin type A [Botox] is effective in slowing hair loss."

His theory is that, "This therapy [that is Botox] dramatically reduces occipitofrontalis muscle tone." And this deadening of the occipitofrontalis is supposed to halt the progression of AGA.
Botox in scalp tissue.png
Botox deadens scalp muscles.
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I agree that the hair follicle is a mechano-sensitive organ; I disagree strongly, though, that this organ (the hair follicle) will benefit from reducing the movement of the scalp. I think that the movement of the scalp generated by the alternating contraction of the frontalis and occipitalis muscles will have a stimulating effect on the hair follicles.

A bit of criticism concerning the style of the article. Professional journals usually have style guidelines telling researchers how to present their findings. They insist on an impersonal presentation written with dignified language. Often the sentences are written in the passive voice. I think that generally this results in terminal dullness. Of course there are exceptions to this dreary style. I've read some excellent articles in professional journals. Perhaps this article is hard to read because it is a translation from Spanish.

garyO
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Re: Tom, maybe you really found a cure.

Post by garyO » Sat Oct 08, 2016 5:27 pm

I'd like to add something I found interesting. The original botox study states this:

"Mechanistically, the scalp behaves like a drum skin with tensioning muscles around the periphery. These muscle groups—the frontalis, occipitalis, and periauricular muscles and to a minor degree the temporalis—can create a “tight” scalp when chronically active. Because the blood supply to the scalp enters through the periphery, a reduction in blood flow would be most apparent at the distal ends of the vessels, specifically, the vertex and frontal peaks. Areas of the scalp with sparse hair growth have been shown to be relatively hypoxic, have slow capillary refill, and to have high levels of dihydrotestosterone.[SUP]4[/SUP]
Conceptually, Botox “loosens” the scalp, reducing pressure on the perforating vasculature, thereby increasing blood flow and oxygen concentration. The enzymatic conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone is oxygen dependent. In low-oxygen environments, the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone is favored; whereas in high-oxygen environments, more testosterone is converted to estradiol.[SUP]4[/SUP] Blood flow may therefore be a primary determinant in follicular health. Strategically placed Botox injections appear able to indirectly modify this variable, resulting in reduced hair loss and new hair growth in some men with androgenetic alopecia."

So his claim about botox's hair-stimulating effect being a result of reducing the muscle tone is quite a "correlation doesn't imply causation" -sort of thing.

Tom Hagerty
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Re: Tom, maybe you really found a cure.

Post by Tom Hagerty » Sun Oct 09, 2016 8:46 am

Strategically placed Botox injections appear able to indirectly modify this variable, resulting in reduced hair loss and new hair growth in some men with androgenetic alopecia.
This is the concluding sentence from the paragraph you posted. GaryO, do you believe that statement? I don't. And we don't have to believe it because neither one of us is pushing a product like Botox or any other drug. We can be relatively objective.

All the following bloated quotations are from the article VegetaHairline posted a link to.

"The involuntary tonic contraction of occipitofrontalis muscle related to psychological stress conditions..."

Yes, people who are in situations that produce chronic psychological stress often have tight scalps. These tight scalps are often uncomfortable, causing tension headaches. Botox injections can ease scalp tension but so can the scalp exercise if it's done correctly.

The point is, though, can Botox increase capillary density and consequent blood flow to areas of the scalp. Botox generally causes weak contractions or no contraction in the muscles where it is injected. Botox if continually administered can also cause muscle atrophy. GaryO, I'm going to ask you - Do you think a Botoxed muscle will have greater blood circulation than a well-exercised, well-developed muscle?

"The rear boundary corresponds to the galea insertion with the occipital bellies, and it was configured as fixation because occipitalis muscles isometric contraction only anchors the galea."

All that this inflated rhetoric means is that the galea is attached to a static occipital muscle at the back of the head. The scalp exercise brings this partially atrophied muscle back to life again. It is no longer static. As it is able to contract strongly, it moves the galea and the whole scalp. My opinion is that this movement tends to relax the scalp and to bring oxygen-loaded blood into the area. If you engage in athletic activities, you know that movement and exercise brings blood into the muscles involved. My ideas about bodybuilding have been extended to the muscles of the scalp. Maybe this is a crazy intellectual leap. What do you think?

I prefer a toned-up scalp and galea to a Botoxed one. Of course I could be way off in my preference. Perhaps Botox is the wave of the future. I also prefer straight, logical language when expressing an idea, not that convoluted gibberish that bought-off scientists and hucksters and politicians often use.
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garyO
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Re: Tom, maybe you really found a cure.

Post by garyO » Sun Oct 09, 2016 10:05 am

Tom Hagerty wrote:
Strategically placed Botox injections appear able to indirectly modify this variable, resulting in reduced hair loss and new hair growth in some men with androgenetic alopecia.
This is the concluding sentence from the paragraph you posted. GaryO, do you believe that statement? I don't. And we don't have to believe it because neither one of us is pushing a product like Botox or any other drug. We can be relatively objective.

Yes, people who are in situations that produce chronic psychological stress often have tight scalps. These tight scalps are often uncomfortable, causing tension headaches. Botox injections can ease scalp tension but so can the scalp exercise if it's done correctly.

The point is, though, can Botox increase capillary density and consequent blood flow to areas of the scalp. Botox generally causes weak contractions or no contraction in the muscles where it is injected. Botox if continually administered can also cause muscle atrophy. GaryO, I'm going to ask you - Do you think a Botoxed muscle will have greater blood circulation than a well-exercised, well-developed muscle?

I think that if Botox really had a beneficial effect on hair loss in that trial, the researchers had no clue what the mechanism behind it is. I guess they always have to come up with some reason, and the bloodflow theory always makes sense so why not go with it haha. But yeah, when speaking about blood circulation I think that something like scalp exercise would be much more sensible thing to do than have botox injections. The quote I posted is from a hair loss forum, I couldn't find the details of the original study. Maybe they did it just to sell more botox treatments.
All that this inflated rhetoric means is that the galea is attached to a static occipital muscle at the back of the head. The scalp exercise brings this partially atrophied muscle back to life again. It is no longer static. As it is able to contract strongly, it moves the galea and the whole scalp. My opinion is that this movement tends to relax the scalp and to bring oxygen-loaded blood into the area. If you engage in athletic activities, you know that movement and exercise brings blood into the muscles involved. My ideas about bodybuilding have been extended to the muscles of the scalp. Maybe this is a crazy intellectual leap. What do you think?
I think it's pretty much safe to say that most balding men have atrophied occipital muscles (well most non-balding men too but maybe it's useless to compare these two). I've also read a lot of anecdotal evidence that balding scalps become hard and unmovable. So anything that helps to change those things could logically make sense. Maybe someday there will be clinical trials for scalp exercises too, I think it wouldn't be too far-fetched to expect some significant results.

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