Sweating and Balding

Discussions about the most common form of male hair loss - androgenetic alopecia
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galeaoman
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:16 am

Sweating and Balding

Post by galeaoman » Sun Jan 01, 2017 9:45 pm

Perhaps on a bald scalp the sweat glands become enlarged as the hair follicles become miniaturized. More research is required to investigate this idea. Humans are naked apes that have less body hair than the other mammals that are covered with fur. Early humans did a lot of persistence hunting, tracking, running, and walking, persistently chasing an animal until the animal suffered heat exhaustion and collapsed. The ability of humans to sweat more than other mammals may have conveyed an advantage over the more hairy beasts. Furry animals have much less sweating abilities than the relatively fur-less humans. One exception is the American hairless terrier that has sweat glands all over its body... No fur = more sweating for mammals...?

https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/educ ... tures.html


Do animals sweat? Most don’t, but some do. Dogs sweat mainly between the pads on the bottom of their paws. One notable exception is the American hairless terrier, which has sweat glands all over its body, illustrating the fact that fur tends to inhibit sweating because if the sweat can’t evaporate it doesn’t help in the cooling process.

Image
The top of a bald scalp sweats more than the top of a hairy scalp. Perhaps where lymphatic drainage is greatest on the human body, more hair grows. I remember that in my early 20's I grew more chest hair after I started practicing the bench press at the gym.

Maybe a bench press for the scalp would be helpful.

With respect to the Hamilton study, I recall reading that 20 year old castrates injected with testosterone started going bald at the normal rate while 60 year old castrates injected with testosterone progressed to almost completely bald in a few months. Genetics could be strongly implicated in male pattern baldness.

Can long lost hair "regrow"? ...maybe in some rare cases...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1977262

Abstract

This 73-year-old white male has been bald since the age of 28. He developed nonA-nonB-induced liver cirrhosis and had been treated with spironolactone for the last 6 years. For the last 3 months, his hair had started to regrow over the scalp. This might be related to the antiandrogenic effect of spironolactone.
Spironolactone is a diuretic...
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daveyreh
Posts: 102
Joined: Sat Sep 26, 2015 11:02 am

Re: Sweating and Balding

Post by daveyreh » Wed Jan 04, 2017 4:47 am

That's fascinating. Bald scalps sweating more than hairy ones. A man predisposed to MPB will then encounter both states in his lifetime. It makes one wonder, what comes first, the chicken or the egg? Sweat glands=endocrine. Hair follicles/hair=integumentary. I think you may be on to something as, normally, people cant grow hair on the bottom of their feet, and can very sweat profusely from there, hence the invention of socks.

But why bring this up? Are you saying that sweat glands enlarge, evicting hair follicles from their homes, causing hair loss?

galeaoman
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:16 am

Re: Sweating and Balding

Post by galeaoman » Thu Jan 05, 2017 5:24 am

daveyreh wrote: But why bring this up? Are you saying that sweat glands enlarge, evicting hair follicles from their homes, causing hair loss?
Fur covering an animal is like us when we wear clothes on a hot day with high temperatures. Sweat cools the body because it evaporates. Now imagine soaking a sweater in a tub of water then putting it on and running a few miles in high degree weather. The soggy sweater would not cool off your body but would probably cause heat exhaustion after a while. Fur and hair impedes the body's ability to cool itself through sweating because sweat cools us by evaporation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspiration#Mechanism

Sweating causes a decrease in core temperature through evaporative cooling at the skin surface. As high energy molecules evaporate from the skin, releasing energy absorbed from the body, the skin and superficial vessels decrease in temperature.
Perhaps the scalp exercise opens potassium channels giving increased hair growth and stabilization. Opening potassium channels causes scalp hair to grow. Opening calcium channels allows sweating...

Is it part of an inverse relation with scalp hair loss and increased scalp sweating being mediated by androgens?

http://www.popsci.com/article/science/g ... able-sweat

In Pakistan, there lives a family of five with a unique – and tragic – condition. Several of their children cannot sweat.
...
For the members of the Pakistan family, their calcium channels never open. The researchers further demonstrated this defect by creating a series of genetically engineered mice without any IP3R2 production. Sure enough the rodents had reduced sweating.

Tom Hagerty
Site Admin
Posts: 580
Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2010 9:21 am

Re: Sweating and Balding

Post by Tom Hagerty » Sat Jan 07, 2017 4:13 pm

Perhaps the scalp exercise opens potassium channels giving increased hair growth and stabilization.
Mechanism of action

The mechanism by which minoxidil promotes hair growth is not fully understood. Minoxidil is a potassium channel opener, causing hyperpolarization of cell membranes. Hypothetically, by widening blood vessels and opening potassium channels, it allows more oxygen, blood, and nutrients to the follicle. This may cause follicles in the telogen phase to shed, which are then replaced by thicker hairs in a new anagen phase.


But read the whole article on Wikipedia about minoxidil. Many people think that the terrible itching and dandruff are caused by the propylene glycol which is the vehicle in many preparations.

I just read about potassium channels in my 2004-textbook on molecular biology. The book is OK for a brush-up but it's hopelessly outdated. Guess how much kids pay for the new university texts on the subject. They cost from $206 to $242 on Amazon. It's nice for a student to have a rich dad.

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