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Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, December 12, 2002 - 09:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Tom,
My scalp moves forward and backward. When I contract the muscles in front the scalp moves forward then when I contract the muscles in back the scalp moves backward. However I always have to contract the front muscles before I can contract the muscles in back. Is this corret?
 

Tom Hagerty (Admin)
Posted on Thursday, December 12, 2002 - 11:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Anonymous:

I think it's correct. I can contract the occipitalis muscles at the back of the head and get some movement. But, of course, the only way to get complete movement of the scalp is by alternately contracting both the frontalis and occipitalis muscles. You're probably doing the exercise right because your scalp moves backward and forward.
 

Anonymous
Posted on Sunday, December 15, 2002 - 10:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Mr. Hagerty,
I would just like to comment that in Gray's Anatomy. He states that when the frontalis muscles and occipitalis muscles alternately contract the scalp moves. However when the frontalis muscles CONTRACT the EYEBROWS are raised and the scalp is pulled foward. When it is pulled back the occipitalis muscles contract. The frontalis muscles pull the eyebrows up and the scalp forward at the same TIME. However, he goes on to state that the absence of either frontalis or occipitalis has been observed. My question is when you do the scalp exercise do you have an attachement of the muscle that increases the movement of your scalp? (Some people are blessed in peculiar ways) Gray has noted the most people have the capability to movetheir scalp. If they have the frontalis and occipitalis muscle. This is also in reply to anonymous question above. I hope this helps you Mr. Hagerty in your explanationsin the furture to those people that suffer from hair loss.

P.S. Your site is very informative and I applaud you for your apparent concern and compassion to those that suffer from hair loss.
 

Anonymous
Posted on Sunday, December 15, 2002 - 10:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Mr.Hagerty,
If you look under ACTIONS Gray's Anantomy explains the movement of the scalp just like you do. This may also be beneficial to thos learning your exercise.
 

Anonymous
Posted on Sunday, December 15, 2002 - 11:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Mr. Hagerty,
I am sure you are tired of reading these. I want to comment that if your scalp moves forward the occipitalis muscles should pull it back. If the scalp does not move FORWARD it may not be the contraction of the frontalis muscles but the extension (I use extension losely, they are actually antaganists for the frontalis) of the occipitalis musclesthey may be to tight to be flexible or the person trying to perform the exercise may not have the muscles at all (As noted in Gray's Anatomy). If this is confusing feel free to erase it. Again thanks for your concern about the suffers of hair loss.
 

Tom Hagerty (Admin)
Posted on Sunday, December 15, 2002 - 03:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Anonymous:

The prose in Gray's Anatomy is not too lively. Many people would be put to sleep by it. But I'm going to quote a paragraph here:

"The frontal portion of the muscle [the frontalis] raises the eyebrows and the skin over the root of the nose, and at the same time draws the scalp forward into transverse wrinkles. The posterior portion [the occipitalis] draws the scalp backward. By bringing alternately into action the frontal and occipital portions, the entire scalp may be moved forward and backward."

That's not really a bad description of the process, but it takes a certain type mind and sensibility to write in such an impersonal style.

The problem that most people will have in learning how to do the exercise is gaining control of the occipitalis muscles. It is unlikely, however, that these muscles will be too tight and therefore prevent the full movement of the scalp. There might be a possibility, though, that these muscles will be completely atrophied. But with atrophied muscles there will often be small fibers left that can be regenerated through exercise. It's often hard to gain control of atrophied muscles. It takes concentration and some discipline. When the exercise is once learned, though, it's easy to do if not exactly fun.

Your question - Do I have some kind of attachment which allows me to achieve great movement of my scalp? Maybe you could clarify this. I hope I'm a normal guy without an "attachment."
 

Tom Hagerty (Admin)
Posted on Sunday, December 15, 2002 - 03:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Anonymous:

I just read once again what you wrote. I focused on one word - apparent - "...I applaud you for your apparent concern and compassion for those that suffer from hair loss." You are very perceptive. The concern and compassion I show is only apparent and not real. My hidden agenda is to use this concern and compassion as a launching pad for my political ambitions just like Citizen Kane.
 

Peter -sorry about the rage - Jason
Posted on Sunday, December 15, 2002 - 04:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Tom is right, with concentration it is possible to isolate and gain control of a muscle group.I now have a limiteda bility to move my scalp forward but it has taken daily practise. I think the exercise is still worth doing even if you can only control one muscle group.

In my case I suspect that my occipitalis is over developed and has restricted the use of frontalis.

Tom claims that his apparent concern is an attempt to gain political power. BUT I think it relates to aliens. If I use my frontalis and occipital at the same time my scalp doesn't move, it merely pulses or throbs, like some b-movie alien from the 'fifties. Mr Hagerty your an alien arnt you ? Thats why your scalp moves, its not practise or dedication at all is it ? Think about it people, Tom's obviously got a hidden agenda.

Seriously, Tom goes way above and beyond with this site and his advice. I am surprised at even the small number of doubters who suggest that his concern is less than honourable. The scalp exercise would be the worst scam in history.

Why do people suspect something from a free exercise that requires nothing ? They shirk at the thought of dedication yet will shed out money for a tub of dimoxinil, a scalp massager and gravity boots without a second thought ?

Tom,perhaps you should include some sort of medical insurance scam with the scalp exercise. People may feel more at home with the regimen then. AS long as somebody is paying through the nose it must work....

TRY THE EXERCISE FOR A YEAR - WHAT HAVE YOU TO LOSE - apart from a few wrinkles ?
 

Anonymous
Posted on Sunday, December 15, 2002 - 05:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Tom,
Gray's Anatomy states that there are documented cases of the frontalis fused with the skin. I wasn't been skeptical. I just find it hard to believe that after all of the discusions the exercise is so simply performed. I was not being sarcastic in any of my previous postings. Your site and your reply's are free of value judgements. As for the attachement comment I apologize for that I didn't realize there would be any offense taken. No insult about you, your site, or your demeaner was intended I was just trying to be objective. For your site I commend you.
 

Tom Hagerty (Admin)
Posted on Monday, December 16, 2002 - 08:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Anonymous:

I did not take any offense at your post. I thought it was an excellent message. It brought me back to my Gray's Anatomy for a refresher course.

When you say that there are cases of the frontalis fused with the skin, do you mean the superficial fascia? This is from my edition of Gray's - "The superficial fascia in the cranial region if a firm, dense, fibro-fatty layer intimately adherent to the integument [skin], and to the Occipito-frontalis and its tendinous aponeurosis." The aponeurosis is synonymous with the galea. Fascia cover all muscles and are adjacent to the skin but are not fused with the skin. I'd like you to quote from Gray's the paragraph that mentions fusing. Thanks.
 

Tom Hagerty (Admin)
Posted on Monday, December 16, 2002 - 08:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Peter Jason:

So you've been watching the Simpsons. I really don't think that Dimoxinil will help Homer though. Only the scalp exercise could improve his ravaged pate.

You wrote something that is absolutely true: "Why do people suspect something from a free exercise that requires nothing? They shirk at the thought of dedication, yet will shed out money for a tub of dimoxinil, a scalp massager, and gravity boots without a second thought."

I checked out Menspharmacy.com where you can get dutasteride (Avodart) without a prescription - 100 capsules for $425. Of course they're sold out already but will be getting more soon. Even if it cost $1000 people would still be pounding at the door. Remember the song - There Is Nothing Like a Pill or was it There Is Nothing Like a Dame? Whatever. People trust what they have to pay a hefty price for and suspect what they get for free.
 

Tom Hagerty (Admin)
Posted on Monday, December 16, 2002 - 08:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Peter Jason:

Just for your edification here's some more stuff that's in Homer's medicine cabinet - Hair Master, Hair Chow, Gorilla Man, Bald Buster, NU GRO, and baby powder.
 

Anonymous
Posted on Monday, December 16, 2002 - 08:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Tom,
The paragraph starts out with VARIATIONS, it is five paragraphs down from where you quoted.
 

Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, December 17, 2002 - 10:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Tom,
How much movement is enough to do the exercise correctly? I read a posting where you said 1 cm is not enough. Does the scalp move several inches or more how much should my scalp move?
 

Tom Hagerty (Admin)
Posted on Wednesday, December 18, 2002 - 09:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Anonymous:

Everyone is anatomically different. The extent of the scalp movement is determined by the muscle and membrane attachments but also on how well you do the exercise. One centimeter is definitely not enough; several inches is impossible. Keep working with the exercise and you'll find the right level of movement after your scalp becomes more flexible.
 

Anonymous
Posted on Friday, January 17, 2003 - 09:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Tom,
I can move my scalp forward between .5 and .75 inches and backward the same amount is this enough or do I need more? My whole scalp moves forward and backward.
 

Tom Hagerty
Posted on Friday, January 17, 2003 - 11:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Anonymous:

If you can feel the occipitalis muscles at the back of your head contracting, you're doing the exercise right. A half inch is certainly enough movement. As soon as you get it up to a full inch, you can join the circus.
 

Anonymous
Posted on Sunday, February 09, 2003 - 06:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Tom,
Do you know if anyone has tried an electric stimulator on the scalp muscles, like the ones used to contract abdominal muscles? Some of these ab stimulators say they can be used on any muscle of the body and I wonder if it would help the scalp.
 

Tom Hagerty
Posted on Sunday, February 09, 2003 - 09:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Anonymous:

I'll ask you a question. Do you know anyone who has an electric stimulator for the muscles, and, if so, did this person stay on it for more than a month? I'm sure your answer will be no on both counts. The people with the great abs that you see in the advertisements don't get those abs with the electric stimulators. They work out with crunches and leg raises.

I've seen articles that speculate about a degree of nerve damage from sustained use of electric stimulators. This may or may not be true. What is true, though, is that real exercise is more beneficial than passive exercise.

Don't be lazy. Learn the scalp exercise, do it the right way, and stick with it for the long haul. You'll benefit from the program.
 

Freddie
Posted on Sunday, February 09, 2003 - 06:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Having musles twitch involuntarily over and over from electric shocks does not seem like a good idea to me either. Might mess up your motor skills in the long run.

We know that bad working habits involving repetative tasks (like using a keyboard without giving your fingers a break) can lead to things like Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in the long term. Its where hands shiver uncontrollably because of nerve damage.

On tv here we have a bunch of guys trying to market these electrical stimulation gizmos on TV. My favourite infomercial is about one chap named Dr. Ho. Now Dr. Ho's device may be questionable but one thing is for certain - his female assistant is a really cute looking hoe. If she was for sale, I'd dail in.
 

Tom Hagerty
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 04:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Freddie:

I love that name. Dr. Ho is probably laughing at the people who buy his device. Ho ho ho. His female assistant is worth looking into though. I seem to have a weakness for female assistants.
 

Freddie
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 07:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Dr. Ho however doesn't even come close to the legendary Tom Vu and his get rich quick infomercials. He'd tell the audience "if you don't have the guts to be rich, you deserve to be poor!" The rest of the infomercial he would be showing off a ferrari (though he never mentioned if it was his or a rental) and sailing with bikini clad girls on a yacht wearing a sweater.

Last I heard, he was indicted by the FL state attorney for some scam and got jailed.
 

arutha
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 10:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Remember William McCorkle, that guy who claimed you could get rich by placing ads in newspapers? Sheesh.

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