Great article about antigens from MPB... Log Out | Topics | Search
Hairloss-Reversible Home Page | Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Hairloss-reversible.com » Male Pattern Baldness » Great article about antigens from MPB-research « Previous Next »

Author Message
 

jpj
New member
Username: Jpj

Post Number: 130
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, October 08, 2006 - 08:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Posted: Sat Oct 07, 2006 8:00 am Post subject:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.hairloss-research.org/february1.html

Chronic systemic inflammation has been found to at the root of many serious disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, asthma, arthritis, cancer, diabetes, depression and androgenetic alopecia. These “age related” disorders are accompanied by a pathological increase of inflammatory cytokines. Lowering pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor –alpha, interleukin – 6, interleukin 1(B) and/or interleukin B4, could help prevent and treat many age related diseases. After several published studies, which showed that inflammation is present in androgenetic alopecia, MPB Research reported these important findings to readers, particularly stressing the need to address inflammation in any hair loss treatment approach, including our recommended protocol. Excessive levels of cytokines can be systemically and topically countered by an appropriate regimen of drugs, nutrients, dietary changes, and/or hormones. For example, fish oil has been shown to effectively lower these levels, as does DHEA, Nettle extract, GLA, and some antioxidants (vitamin E and N-acetyl cysteine). Meanwhile certain herbal extracts patented by Asian companies, Emu oil, copper peptides and ketoconazole can be used to topically partially inhibit cytokine formation. Following is an extensive analysis (in layman’s terms) that makes the connection between inflammation, and the “programmed cell death” of the hair follicle, a process known as “apoptosis”. It is partially based upon input from Waseda, a Japanese researcher who has been researching inflammation and androgenetic hair loss for many years. He has been able to initiate extensive hair regrowth after being a “slick bald” Norwood 5 for many years using an aggressive combination of therapies specifically designed to counter inflammation and an apoptosis factors.



TOWARDS A COMPREHENSIVE TREATMENT OF MPB

First we must recognize that hair loss is the consequence of hair cell apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Apoptosis is the final result of what is termed the caspase activation cascade. Essentially DHT, superoxide, and other free radicals damage the cell’s mitochondria, and the damaged mitochondria in turn vomits cytochrome C, which activates the caspase 9 cascade. TGF-beta and alpha activate caspase 9 around hair follicles. The activated caspase 9 propagates downstream into caspase 3. Activation of caspase 3 is thought to be a direct cause of cell apoptosis (programmed cell death) in general. What then causes a caspase activation cascade and how can one intervene in the context of hair loss?
Protein Kinase C (PKC) as an executor of apoptosis PKC isozymes are involved in the final execution of hair cell apoptosis in relation to caspase 3. What are good inhibitors of PKC? Cycloporin (dangerous), Grape Seed Extract, Resveratrol (as in red wine), Vitamin E, and N-Acetyl Cysteine. Topically, Grape Seed Extract (a patented treatment for hair loss), and Perilla Leaf Extract.
Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-a) as a promotor of PKC and hair cell apoptosis. TNF-a induces the PKC isozymes and causes cell death through this induction. This pathway is known to be a major cause of hair loss. TNF-a is a quick acting proinflammatory cytokine, and TNF-a is over secreted in cases of rapid hair loss. How can TNF-a be safely inhibited? Ginkgo Biloba Extract, Stinging Nettle Extract, Green Tea Extract, and essential fatty acids found in fish, Emu, Borage, and Perilla oils. Topically, Perilla leaf extract may be useful.
TGF-Family as the bridge between DHT and the activation of the caspase cascade. In recent studies researchers have found DHT promotes TGF, and TGF causes activation of the caspase cascade and thus, hair cell death, which clinically manifests as male and female pattern baldness. What inhibits TGH safely, as opposed to the dangerous anti-cancer compounds? Proteolytic Enzymes such as a bromelain, and the anti-oxidant Curcumin are TGF inhibitors. Shiseido, a Japanese cosmetic company found that Amacha, a sugar alternative found in the orient has TGF inhibition properties. Dr. Sawaya’s latest study about finasteride suggests that the best hair loss prevention would involve the blocking of caspase activation, especially caspase 3. Caspase 3 is the direct cause of programmed hair cell death (apoptosis) that originates “upstream”. The first triggers may be DHT damage or oxidative (free radical) stress on the mitochondria, TGF induction from DHT, TNF-A induction from allergic inflammation, or PKC upregulation by caspase activation. Here we can summarize the rationale behind the treatments of various pro-inflammatory mechanisms.

DHT inhibition- Finasteride, Saw Palmetto, Rivoflavin, Green Tea Extract, Copper, Peptides, and Topical Bayberry Extract.

PKC down regulation - Grape Seed Extract, Resveratrol, Vitamin E, Soy Isoflavones.

TNF-a down regulation- Curcumin, Ginkgo Biloba Extract, Stinging Nettle Extract, Green Tea Extract, Fish Oil, Borage Oil, Perilla Oil, and Topical Perilla leaf extract.

TGF down regulation- Curcumin, and topical Amacha.

Taking into account the inhibition of hair apoptosis factors, it is apparent that treatment can be taken to a new level. Again, Waseda himself is experiencing regrowth in all areas of his scalp after being a slick bald “Norwood 5” for many years



The PKC, TNF, and TGF are apparently some of the bad things that dermal papilla's release after enough DHT or T is transcribed in a receptor site. We know that its the dermal papilla that releases the "growth inhibitors" to the rest of the follicle in MPB. A very knowledgeable med student named DOCJ077 has stated that based on his readings and experience with TGF-beta one, that he thinks this might be the growth inhibitor that leads to inflammation and fibrosis around the hair follicle and might just be what the immune system reacts to. Very interesting.
 

Tom Hagerty
Moderator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 2899
Registered: 01-2003
Posted on Monday, October 09, 2006 - 08:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Just about the only thing missing from that salad of nutrients and supplements is green apples. A delicious way to incorporate green apples into your diet is to make applesauce. Cut the apples up into small pieces, boil them for twenty minutes, add some cinnamon and brown or turbinado sugar. Then let it stand for an hour or two. It's good stuff. Cinnamon is supposed to have some beneficial phytochemical properties too.

Curcumin is found in the spice turmeric. I get it at Whole Foods. According to several studies this herb blocks toxic compounds - inflammatory causing factors - from reaching or reacting with body tissues. It's a major component of the Indian diet.
 

jpj
New member
Username: Jpj

Post Number: 133
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, October 13, 2006 - 02:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Tom,

Thought you would enjoy this nutritional article concerning cancer prevention :
http://www.nutritional-solutions.net/PDF/NJBTpresentation2005.pdf
 

Tom Hagerty
Moderator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 2904
Registered: 01-2003
Posted on Saturday, October 14, 2006 - 09:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

jpj:

I was surprised about copper. I know this mineral is important for hair color, but I guess like most nutrients you don't want too much. This also goes for calcium and vitamin A. Too much calcium in the diet is associated with prostate cancer - and of course you already know about too much vitamin A from animal sources.

Here's an article Dr. Andrew Weil wrote a few days ago about turmeric, which I use every day:
I continue to be amazed by healing power of turmeric, a spice that has been used for centuries in traditional Indian and Asian cultures as both food and medicine. One of turmeric’s active ingredients, curcumin, has been shown to combat the spread of skin and breast tumor cells. Now, in a paper in the September issue of Clinical Cancer Research, scientists at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that curcumin blocks development of a hormone that contributes to colorectal cancer. “Our findings suggest that curcumin may be useful for colon cancer treatment,” said researcher B. Mark Evers. A high rate of turmeric consumption has also been cited as a reason for the low incidence of Alzheimer’s disease in India.

Bottom line: add turmeric to your diet in any way you can, as a spice in food (turmeric is part of the spice mix that makes curry powder), or as a cold tea, which is the preferred method of ingesting it in Okinawa, the island culture famed for health and longevity.

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.