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Wookie
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Username: Wookie

Post Number: 3
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, July 19, 2006 - 03:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Glad I got off the beta sitosterol, even if dropping it did cause a massive shed.


http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2003-11/pn-hbl111003.php


quote:

Higher blood levels of sitosterol may be associated with increased risk for coronary events

ORLANDO, Fla., Nov. 10, 2003 – Results from a nested, case-control study showed that patients with both high coronary risk and higher blood levels of sitosterol (1) (a plant sterol) were at an increased risk of a major coronary event compared to similar patients with lower blood levels of the plant sterol. These results were presented today at the 2003 American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions. Very high levels of plant sterols in the blood (levels ranging from 200 to 1570 µmol/L [2,3]) have been previously confirmed as a risk factor for coronary heart disease.(4)
In this study, 177 cases (patients who suffered myocardial infarction [MI] or sudden coronary death within 10 years of follow-up) were selected from the PROCAM (Prospective Cardiovascular Muenster) study population. Each case was matched to two controls (n=354) from PROCAM based on age, gender, smoking status and date of investigation. Phytosterol concentrations, including sitosterol, were measured in samples collected at baseline in order to determine an association between phytosterol blood levels and increased risk for future coronary events.

Results from the study, which was funded in part by Merck/Schering-Plough

Pharmaceuticals, showed that levels of sitosterol were higher in patients who suffered coronary events compared to the matched controls (5.03 ± 3.44 µmol/L vs. 4.31 ± 2.38 µmol/L, p=0.003).

In addition, results from this preliminary study showed that study patients with modestly elevated (5) levels of sitosterol (>5.25µmol/L) and high LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) (=4.14 mmol/L) were at nearly double the risk of a major coronary event compared to those with high LDL-C and sitosterol in the lower ranges (=5.25µmol/L; p=0.025). Men considered at high risk for coronary events (>20 percent in 10 years as calculated using the PROCAM algorithm), who also had modestly elevated levels of sitosterol were at an estimated three-fold increased risk compared to those with sitosterol in the lower ranges (p=0.032).

"The results seen in these patients would suggest that sitosterol absorbed from the intestine may lead to modest elevations of sitosterol in the blood, which in turn may be associated with an increased risk for coronary events. However, nested case-control studies are preliminary by nature and results from studies of this kind should be viewed very cautiously," said Gerd Assmann, M.D., professor, University of Muenster, Germany. "Further studies will certainly be needed to determine if sitosterol might play a role as a marker for increased risk of heart disease."


 

Wookie
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Username: Wookie

Post Number: 4
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, July 19, 2006 - 03:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

I hope mr. hagerty corrects my spelling mistake in the title from sitoserol to sitosterol ;)
 

Admin
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Username: Admin

Post Number: 2752
Registered: 01-2003
Posted on Wednesday, July 19, 2006 - 02:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Wookie:

I was thinking of ordering beta sitosterol softgels from Puritan's Pride. The study that you took this quotation from saved me some money and possibly some heart problems: "Higher blood levels of sitosterol may be associated with increased risk for coronary events."

I made the correction. We don't want the kiddies who come to this site to develop bad spelling habits because of the example of their elders.
 

Jpj
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Username: Jpj

Post Number: 4
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, July 19, 2006 - 06:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

A Japanese outfit has taken out a patent there for topical usage of beta sitosterol for baldness. I think this might be a prime example of a substance that may help topically, but one wouldn't perhaps want to take too much internally. If you like avacodos, you get beta-sitosterol. Its in various nuts and grains, but no natural substance contains a mother lode of this stuff (believe me I checked). Corn oil was something like .9% beta-sis, but it is associated with cancer in lab rats after long term topical application. There is a substance that is a chemical byproduct of another compound called tall oil that is a whopping 18% beta-sitosterol. I read on one site that a company that makes alot of tall oil was interested in ways to market the tall oil for the beta sitosterol therein.

It might be something of a receptor blocker (hairloss-research.org suggests this possibility). Until its formally tested, who knows? Ive been meaning to put a little of this on my wrists or something (in the form of avocado oil). When I put Revivogen on my wrists (remember, I already take Propecia), I was suprised by just how well it inhibited body hair growth. I really dont believe (like Bryan) that type 1 alpha five reductase is responsible for much hair growth (if any). I think either the saw palmetto or the beta sis was inhibiting uptake of other forms of testosterone or inhibiting them around the area of application. I cant think of any other reason one wrist saw such a reduction in body hair.
 

Wookie
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Username: Wookie

Post Number: 5
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, July 20, 2006 - 12:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

High levels of phytosterols don't appear to be good:



quote:

Phytosterols may play role in atherosclerosis





Based on a presentation by Ira Tabas, MD, PhD

NEW ORLEANS—Plant sterols (phytosterols) and stanols can reduce the absorption of cholesterol. They mimic and displace cholesterol in micellar particles. Although they may constitute 50% of the sterols consumed in the diet, the body very strictly limits their circulating amounts.

Ira Tabas, MD, PhD, professor of medicine, cell biology, and physiology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, said these compounds can be very detrimental if physiologic defects allow them to circulate.

He cited the rare example of patients with sitosterolemia, caused by mutations in ABCG5/G8, who have a markedly increased incidence of atherothrombotic events not easily explained by other risk factors. These patients also have tendon xanthomas associated with cholesterol-loaded macrophages, as also seen in familial hypercholesterolemia.

Dr Tabas said the rare condition of sitolsterolemia can inform us about disease processes in the general population. People absorb different amounts of plant sterols from the diet, and plasma levels vary between 1 and 25 micromolar (vs 250-1560 micromolar in beta-sitosterolemia).

The Prospective Cardiovascular Münster (PROCAM) study, a nested case-control study of about 20 000 men and women in Germany reported by Gerd Assmann at the 2003 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association (Circulation. 2003; 108:IV-730), found that people in the upper quartile of sitosterol levels had a 1.8-fold increased risk of major coronary events compared with those in the lower 3 quartiles (P = .014). In men with a 20% coronary event risk over 10 years, high sitosterol levels were associated with an additional 3-fold increase in risk (P = .032). "If verified by more studies, the variation in plant sterols in the general population may be important," Dr Tabas said.

A small study reported the year before (Metabolism. 2002;51:1519-1521) found that patients with a family history of coronary heart disease undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting had higher blood levels of the phytosterol campesterol compared with patients without such a family history (P = .004).

While cholesterol may be bad for the heart, Dr Tabas said phytosterols may be even worse, and the body has developed an efficient mechanism to keep them out. Atherosclerotic plaques consist in part of dead macrophages. Early in lesion formation, macrophages esterify cholesterol through the action of acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT). But much later, ACAT fails, and they pick up free cholesterol, which is toxic to them. Cholesterol intercalates into the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum, where it disrupts a calcium pump, the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase.

The macrophages die, and they form the necrotic core of plaque—"a graveyard of dead macrophages," according to Dr Tabas. This core is rich in matrix proteases, inflammatory stimuli, and procoagulant factors that may facilitate plaque rupture and thrombus formation.

Plant sterols, molecules structurally similar to cholesterol but with a slight difference in their side chains, act in a similar manner. However, ACAT, the enzyme that esterifies cholesterol in macrophages early in plaque formation, does not recognize phytosterols, such as campesterol and beta-sitosterol. So the free forms of these molecules accumulate immediately, which may kill macrophages sooner rather than later. "When cholesterol gets into a macrophage, it is going to get esterified, which is a safety feature," Dr Tabas said. "The plant sterols can’t do that" (Figure 1).

He hypothesized that plant sterols could therefore accelerate plaque formation and promote coronary artery disease (CAD), but the body has an efficient mechanism to eliminate them. Plant sterols and stanol esters are widely used as dietary supplements to inhibit cholesterol absorption. Low absorption does occur however, leading to low but finite increases in plasma levels. "As suggested by the PROCAM study, it raises, at least in my mind, potential questions," Dr Tabas said. He added that he raised the question on theoretical grounds and was not presenting evidence of known detrimental effects of these compounds.

The same transport system in the intestinal wall that takes up cholesterol also takes up plant sterols, and ezetimibe blocks both. It is, in fact, a treatment for patients with sitosterolemia, a rare condition of hyperabsorption of phytosterols (Figure 2).

Dr Tabas concluded with these points:

Very high levels of phytosterols (eg, in sitosterolemia) are associated with premature CAD.
Moderately increased levels of phytosterols in the general population were associated with CAD in the PROCAM study.
Atherogenicity of phytosterols may be related to their effects on macrophage ER membranes, killing the macrophages and leading to advanced atherosclerotic lesions.
The question remains as to whether lowering serum levels of plant sterols with a drug such as ezetimibe will decrease the incidence of CAD in the general population (as well as in patients with sitosterolemia).


 

Ritchie
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Username: Ritchie

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, July 23, 2006 - 01:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Jpj,

You wrote about a certain "Tall oil". Did you mean "Till oil"?
 

jpj
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Username: Jpj

Post Number: 9
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, July 23, 2006 - 08:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ritchie,

I meant tall oil, which is basically pine oil ..........it has alot of beta sis in it. Read here ,,,,,


"After one really researches beta-sitosterol it becomes obvious that herbs are a completely uneconomic source, but soybeans, sugar cane pulp and pine oil (tall oil) are excellent, inexpensive sources. Many sugar processors now extract the valuable chemicals from the pulp after the sugar is pressed out." Got that from here http://www.supplementdirect.com/?content=52&product_id=13145


You can read about tall oil here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tall_oil


It has the highest percentage of beta sis that you will find. Beta sis does not occur in a huge amount in any other thing that Ive found. Its .5% of avocado oil, .9% of corn oil (which has been linked with cancers when used topically on lab rats), and .2-.4% of Saw Palmetto oil.

Its something like 18% of tall oil if I remember correctly. Many times more than anything else.

A patent has been taken out in Japan for its use topically as a baldness remedy (evidently they can patent natural things over there). I guess if you had a pine tree in the back yard, you could peel some of the damned bark and make a bit yourself.


Like Wookie wrote, beta sis resembles cholesterol, so you wouldnt want a ton of this in your veins. I believe this a great example of a substance that possibly might have a good effect topically.



I just started a self test with saw palmetto oil extract on my left wrist today. In a couple of months (or perhaps three), I'll report back and tell everybody if it acted as an anti-androgen and reduce the growth as compared with my right wrist. I tried this with revivogen once (which has saw palmetto and beta sitosterol in it). It really worked and reduced the hair on the right wrist pretty drammatically. I can see why revivogen stinks though. This saw palmetto oil smells awful, a sweet stench like a landfill.
 

hairy wookie
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Username: Wookie

Post Number: 11
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, July 24, 2006 - 02:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=Abstra ctPlus&list_uids=12894997&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum


quote:

The results showed that androgen treatment increased the secretion of TGF-beta-1 into the conditioned medium. Moreover, neutralizing anti-TGF-beta-1 antibody reversed the inhibition of KC proliferation. Thus, we suggest that androgen-inducible TGF-beta-1 derived from DPCs mediates hair growth suppression in AGA.






http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?Aktion=ShowFulltext&ProduktNr= 224083&Ausgabe=225709&ArtikelNr=20227


quote:

Beta-sitosterol was able to induce the expression and secretion of TGF-B-1 significantly between 1.26- and 1.86-fold compared to a cholesterol and the nonsupplemented control in 6 of 8 individual cultures.


 

Ritchie
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Username: Ritchie

Post Number: 2
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, July 24, 2006 - 10:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Jpj,

Isnt it widely believed that Plant sterols compete with Cholesterol and help the body eliminate some cholestrol? I agree too much of it may not be a good idea though

Tom, I love the registration feature! Mucho more Info, Mucho less nonsense!
 

Ritchie
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Username: Ritchie

Post Number: 3
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, July 24, 2006 - 10:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

And the spell check too! Brothers from Europe and Asia must be breathing easy
 

hairy wookie
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Username: Wookie

Post Number: 24
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, August 08, 2006 - 11:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

There also appears to be some sort of chemical castration effect associated with beta-sitosterol?

http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/1809820


quote:

Antifertility effects of beta-sitosterol in male albino rats.
Medscape Newsletters

J Ethnopharmacol. 1991; 35(2):149-53 (ISSN: 0378-8741)
Malini T; Vanithakumari G
Department of Endocrinology, Postgraduate Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Taramani, Madras, India.

The effects of beta-sitosterol on fertility, epididymal sperm counts and testicular and accessory reproductive organ weights were evaluated in male albino rats. The effects were studied at two dosages (0.5 and 5 mg/kg per day rat subcutaneously) for 16, 32 and 48 days. The antifertility effect of beta-sitosterol was pronounced only at the high dose level, but there was a significant decrease in testicular weight and sperm concentrations after long-term treatment with the low dose of beta-sitosterol. The weights of all accessory sex tissues except caput epididymis increased following low dose sitosterol treatment. High dose treatment reduced the sperm concentrations as well as the weights of testis and accessory sex tissues in a time-dependent manner. Withdrawal of treatment for 30 days restored only the weights of accessory sex tissues to near normal conditions.


 

Tom Hagerty
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Username: Admin

Post Number: 2796
Registered: 01-2003
Posted on Wednesday, August 09, 2006 - 07:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

hairy wookie:

The supplement companies are pushing this "miracle" sterol. Here's what Puritan's Pride says about it:
This product contains one of the most abundant plant sterols available in nature. Recent scientific studies document the ability of sterols to benefit heart, nutritional and prostate health.

Swansan Health Products says:
A natural choice for everyday cardiovascular maintenance. Works naturally to help promote a favorable lipid balance.

Of course I'm sure we both know that supplement companies can say almost anything they want about their products without any oversight from the FDA.
 

hairy wookie
New member
Username: Wookie

Post Number: 25
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 03:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Yes, I hope I am wrong about beta-sitosterol. That would be good.

http://www.acu-cell.com/ster.html


quote:

I have followed the progress of a number of patients who had started using phytosterols for a variety of medical disorders that beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, campesterol, or any number of other sterols or sterolins are supposed to be beneficial for, and at some point, I actually encouraged some patients to experiment with these products to help evaluate the effectiveness of phytosterols for their conditions.

I also monitored my own chemistry while supplementing larger doses of sterols and sterolins myself in the hope of coming up with any specific positive or negative effects. Over several years now, there have been either no, or few changes for better or worse with any number of medical conditions the products were used for. One patient was able to control her long-term wheat allergy by supplementing one or two 127.5 mg phytosterol caps per day (which contained beta-sterolins, beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol and campesterol), however she also had to add sufficient amounts of either lime juice, or glutamic acid tabs with every meal. Neither the stomach acid support, nor the phytosterols alone worked by themselves.



Since many (plant) foods already contain sufficient amounts of phytosterol compounds, additional supplementation of sterols and sterolins seems to largely benefit those individuals who follow extreme
dietary lifestyles, such as long-term junk diets, ongoing diets for weight control purposes, or restricted diets because of food allergies. Of course in the first two instances, following a healthier lifestyle would be the better option.



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